Free Aptitude Test Practice Questions Downloadable Ebooks

Free Aptitude Test Practice Questions Downloadable Ebooks

One of the criteria to get employed in certain company is going through the aptitude test in which your score will be compare to a control score and that is where you will be scored either successful of not. For the company that uses aptitude test, there are certain score you need to attain before you can be called for another stage of the recruitment process. In this article, aptitude test has been grouped into 6 categories, each category has different ways aptitude can be set and it also tells what kind of aptitude test you should be expecting depending on your choosing king of job or company. For you to the download any of them, you will find a clickable link at the beginning of each types of aptitude under the categories, click on the link and it will start the download in no time and that will give you an opportunity to study them offline.
1. Numerical Aptitude:
Test your ability to use the basic principles of arithmetic like addition, subtraction, multiplication and division. They may also use mathematical terms and methods such as decimals, percentages, ratios, roots, fractions, powers and exponents.
These questions make no attempt to test your numerical reasoning ability.  The method you need to get the correct answer will be obvious and to score well on these questions you will simply need to make quick and accurate calculations.
If you are very rusty with arithmetic, try re-learning the times tables up to 12 and practice multiplication, division and percentage calculations. Practice can improve your test scores for all types of aptitude tests, so try as many examples as you can.
These questions are directly applicable to many administrative and clerical jobs but can also appear as a component of graduate and managerial tests. The speed at which you can answer these questions is the critical measure, as most people could achieve a very high score given unlimited time in which to answer. You can therefore expect 25-35 questions in 20-30 minutes.
The ability to interpret data presented in tables, graphs and charts is a common requirement in many management and professional jobs.
If you are applying for a job which involves analysis of or decision-making based on numerical data then you can expect to answer data interpretation questions.
Data Interpretation questions are very widely used to assessing candidates for graduate and management level jobs. Many people who have been out of the education system for a while or who don’t use interpret graphs, pie charts, scatter diagrams and tables of data on a day-to-day basis may feel overawed by these types of question. The important thing to remember is that you don’t need to have studied mathematics to a high level to succeed. These questions are primarily tests of interpretation and the math needed is invariably straightforward. You will usually be allowed to use a calculator for these types of question and investing in one which can handle fractions and percentages is a good idea. You should also try to work through a few numerical computation practice papers to get back into swing of these types of calculation.
Numerical estimation is key in many craft and technical jobs where the ability to quickly and accurately estimate material quantities is essential.
Numerical estimation questions usually form only part of a numerical ability test and you can also expect numerical computation questions.
Even though numerical estimation questions appear straightforward, it can take some time to develop the optimum compromise between speed and accuracy. Before you attempt to answer each question, look at the range of answers available and ask yourself how accurate your estimate needs to be. For example, is an order of magnitude sufficient or does the answer needs to be worked out to the nearest whole number?
If you out of practice with arithmetic then try re-learning the times tables up to 12 and practice rough and ready multiplication, division and percentage calculations. Practice can improve your test scores for all types of aptitude tests but numerical estimation is one area where it can really make a difference, so try as many examples as you can.
These sample numerical estimation questions are directly applicable to tests used to select for craft and technical jobs. However, the ability to make quick estimates is a useful skill to have even if you are sitting a graduate or professional level test as it will enable you to roughly check your answers to data interpretation questions.
In Numerical reasoning questions, information are provided that requires you to interpret it and then apply the appropriate logic to answer the questions. In other words, you need to work out how to get the answer rather than what calculations to apply.
Sometimes the questions are designed to approximate the type of reasoning required in the workplace. The questions will often use very specific illustrations, for example the question may present financial data or use information technology jargon. However, an understanding of these areas is not required to answer the question. Number series questions can also be classified as numerical reasoning questions. These types of question are very commonly used in graduate and managerial selection.
Numerical reasoning tests are an increasingly popular way of assessing candidates during the job selection process. Many people who have been out of the education system for a while or who don’t use maths on a day-to-day basis feel intimidated by these types of test. The important thing to remember is that you don’t need to have studied mathematics to a high level to succeed. These are primarily tests of reasoning ability and the math needed is invariably straightforward. Although you may need to get back up to speed with percentages, ratios, proportions, fractions and decimals.
You will usually be allowed to use a calculator for these types of question and investing in one which can handle fractions and percentages is a good idea. You should also try to work through a few numerical computation practice papers to get back into swing of these types of calculation.
2. Verbal Aptitude:
 Verbal comprehension questions consist of a short passage of text and some related questions. They will often be about a topic which is unfamiliar to you, but this is an advantage rather than a disadvantage because you need to answer the questions based only on the information that you are given – not using any knowledge that you already have.
These types of question appear in all levels of verbal ability tests but may be more detailed and technical in graduate and management level tests.
The verbal comprehension tests found in aptitude tests tend to follow a similar format in which you are asked to read through each passage and evaluate the statements that follow it. Each statement may be either:
True – The statement is true given the information in the passage.
False – The statement is false given the information in the passage.
Can’t Say – There is insufficient information to say whether the statement is true or false.
Remember that you can only evaluate the statements using the supplied passage and that you must not use any knowledge that you already have.
Word relationship questions assess your ability to identify the relationship between words and to then apply this verbal analogy. To answer these questions you need to understand the meaning of the words in the question and establish what exactly the relationship is between them.
You should then look at the answer options and decide which answer is the most appropriate. These questions test your reasoning ability as well as your vocabulary. These types of question appear in nearly all levels of verbal ability tests.
Word relationship questions often take the form of verbal analogies. These can be classified into specific categories. For example; materials, taxonomic relationships, temporal relationships, parts of speech etc. The list is almost endless. Be sure that you understand what an analogy is before you start. Every analogy expresses a relationship between two things. It is this relationship that you must understand as you look at the options required to complete the analogy.
First try to understand the relationships expressed in the question words. Then choose your answer so that the relationship in the first pair of words is similar to the relationship in the second pair of words in terms of meaning, order and function.
Check that the parts of speech used in the two sections of analogy are consistent and follow in the same sequence. For example, if the first pair of words contains an adjective and a noun in that order, then the second pair of words must contain an adjective and a noun in the same order. Test designers are very fond of offering answer options which initially seem credible but where this golden rule is broken.
Word meaning questions are designed to measure your vocabulary, specifically your understanding of word meanings. To achieve this, the questions focus on the relationships between words and the questions are phrased such that you need to know the precise meaning of the words given in order to select the correct answer.
These questions often use synonyms and antonyms (words which have either the same or opposite meanings), dictionary definitions and word pairs.
Another type of word meaning question uses words which sound similar but have different meanings. These are called homophones and an example would be the words ‘allude’ and ‘elude’. ‘Allude’ means ‘referred’ and ‘elude’ means ‘escaped from’. Once again, the test designer needs to choose common homophones which are in regular use and this leaves a relatively restricted list to choose from.
These verbal critical reasoning questions are not so much concerned with measuring your facility with English. They are designed to test your ability to take a series of facts expressed in words and to understand and manipulate the information to solve a specific problem.
These questions are usually restricted to graduate and management level tests.
It is not always easy to assess whether someone has the ability to interpret information in an analytical way and to make sound judgments based on their conclusions. This is particularly true if individuals are applying for their first management job and do not have a track record of successful decision making.
Critical reasoning questions require you to demonstrate your ability to make logical decisions and even to recognize that insufficient data has been provided for a definitive answer to be reached, as would be the case in many real-life situations.
Questions where you have to identify incorrectly spelt words are common in all levels of  verbal ability tests. The test designer needs to choose commonly misspelled words which are in regular use, as it would be unfair to use obscure words which only a small percentage of candidates could be expected to know.
This means that the test designer has a relatively restricted list of words to choose from and you will find that the same words tend to appear in many different suppliers tests.
Many test suppliers frame their spelling questions in a different way to those in this practice test. For example:
1. Choose the pair of words that best completes the sentence.
 The ——– of the timetable caused some ———-.
 A) rivision                   B) revision      C) revission    D) revition
A) inconvenience        B) inconvenince         C) inconveneince       D)inconvenience
 3. Abstract Reasoning Ability:
Abstract reasoning questions test your ability to identify patterns presented in diagrammatic form and are not dependent on your knowledge of English or maths. Because they are visual questions and are independent of language and mathematical ability, they are considered to be an accurate indicator of your general intellectual ability as well as being ‘culturally fair’. Abstract reasoning ability is believed to be the best indicator of fluid intelligence and your ability to learn new things quickly.
These questions use symbols arranged in a straight line or in a pattern and you are required to identify the missing symbol or the next in the sequence. Abstract reasoning ability questions are invariably multiple-choice and strictly timed. These types of question are very commonly used in graduate and managerial selection.
It is not always easy to assess whether someone has the intellectual ability to see patterns and draw conclusions from unfamiliar information. Abstract reasoning questions require you to demonstrate your ability to understand complex concepts and assimilate new information. As a measure of reasoning ability, these questions are independent of educational and cultural background and provide the best indication of your intellectual potential.
Infer rules from a diagram and then apply those rules to a new situation Follow a series of logical instructions presented using symbols
Follow flowchart or pseudo-code logic
These types of questions can appear in other types of test but they are particularly suited to information technology jobs in which analysts and programmers need to be able to work through complex problems in an analytical way.
It is not always easy to assess whether someone has the analytical ability needed to succeed in a technical job in the information technology industry. Many people who are regarded as ‘intelligent’ and who have good academic qualifications find this kind of pure analytical thinking both alien and difficult. It is widely accepted in the IT industry that a ‘natural’ programmer can be many times more productive than someone who does not share this ‘natural’ ability. It is not surprising therefore that diagrammatic reasoning tests are used extensively to select software developers.
4. Spatial Ability:
Spatial Ability questions measure your ability to form mental images, and visualize movement or change in those images. Spatial ability tests often involve the visual assembly and the disassembly of objects that have been rotated or which are viewed from different angles.
Spatial ability is required in production, technical and design jobs where plans and drawings are used, for example; engineering, architecture, surveying and design. However, it is also important in some branches of science where the ability to envisage the interactions of 3 dimensional components is essential.
At first sight some of these questions look very similar to abstract reasoning questions – they are not. Spatial ability questions are concerned only with your ability to mentally manipulate shapes, not to identify patterns and make logical deductions. They are not routinely used in graduate and management level tests unless the job specifically requires good spatial skills.
All spatial ability tests rely on you being able to imagine what would happen in your mind’s eye. Unfortunately, about 5% of the adult population find it impossible to imagine two-dimensional shapes being moved through a third dimension. This is thought to be because there is a genetic factor involved in spatial reasoning ability.
5. Technical Ability:
Mechanical reasoning tests are designed to assess your knowledge of physical and mechanical principles. Mechanical reasoning questions vary widely in difficulty from test to test and because of this it is not easy to produce a practice test applicable to everyone. You may find that some of the questions in the practice tests available on this website are too detailed and difficult for your needs.
If you are taking a mechanical reasoning test as part of the selection process for the emergency services or the military then the questions you can expect will tend to concentrate on principles rather than on making calculations. For example, you may be shown 3 diagrams of a lever and asked which one is the most efficient. If however, you are taking a test for a craft or technical job then you may be expected to calculate the actual force required to move a particular lever. In this case, knowing the principle is not enough; you need to know the formula.
Mechanical reasoning tests are used to select for a wide range of jobs including the military (Armed Services Vocational Aptitude Battery), police forces, fire services, as well as many craft, technical and engineering occupations.
Mechanical Reasoning for Emergency Services and Military Jobs
If you are taking a mechanical reasoning test as part of the selection process for the emergency services or the military then the questions you can expect will tend to concentrate on principles rather than on making calculations. For example, you may be shown 3 diagrams of a lever and asked which one is the most efficient. This is very different from craft and technical tests where you will usually be expected to make calculations.
Mechanical Reasoning for Craft and Technical Jobs
If you are taking a test as part of the selection for a craft or apprenticeship job, then you may be asked some questions about tools and how they are used. You should also expect some shop arithmetic questions. These questions approximate the type of reasoning and maths that are needed to estimate materials costs etc.
Mechanical Reasoning – Remember, the scenario is incidental
Many of the questions in mechanical reasoning tests are ‘industry’ specific. For example, tests used by the fire service tend to frame the questions in terms of fire-fighting whereas tests used to select for an aircraft maintenance job would tend to frame the questions in aviation industry terms. It doesn’t matter if the questions you practice on aren’t specific to the industry you are applying for. It is the substance of the question that is important – the scenario is incidental.
These tests are used to select technical personnel who need to be able to find and repair faults in electronic and mechanical systems. As modern equipment of all types becomes more dependent on electronic control systems (and arguably more complex) the ability to approach problems logically in order to find the cause of the fault is increasingly important. This type of test is used extensively to select technical and maintenance personnel as well as to select for artificer (technical) roles within the armed forces. For example, aircraft technician. Fault Diagnosis tests usually form part of a test battery in which verbal reasoning and numerical reasoning also feature. No specialized knowledge is required to answer these fault diagnosis questions (unlike mechanical reasoning)
6. Clerical Ability:
Concentration tests are used to select personnel who need to work through items of information in a systematic way while making very few mistakes.
They are most often used when selecting candidates for administrative and clerical jobs where mistakes can have serious or expensive consequences. This includes areas like financial services, legal services and healthcare
Concentration tests are speed tests. This means that given sufficient time to complete them, most people would be able to obtain a perfect score provided that they were capable of working in a systematic and careful way. However, the time limit is usually set so that the test is impossible to complete. In addition, the questions tend to be similar and rather repetitive which makes it difficult to maintain attentiveness. These factors taken together make this type of test ideal for selecting candidates who are able to process information accurately and maintain their concentration even when certain parts of the job may be repetitive.
Data checking tests present you with a number of tables of information which must be checked against each other. This type of test is used to measure how quickly and accurately errors can be detected in data.
It is used to select candidates for clerical and data input jobs, particularly where accuracy is important.
This data may be either meaningless, for example account numbers, or may be fairly meaningful, for example names and addresses. In both cases is vital to check each character rather than ‘read’ the data normally. You should also bear in mind that there may be more than one error in any single piece of data.
These tests usually contain between 20 and 40 questions and take 10-20 minutes to complete. It is important, although difficult, to maintain your concentration for the full duration of the test. The speed at which you can answer these questions is the critical measure, as most people could achieve a very high score given unlimited time in which to answer.
This article is gotten courtesy of Psychometric Success; if you need more advance test on any types of aptitude test for job preparation, you can visit their website at www.psychometric-success.com and purchase their book which will take you deeper than these free downloadable.

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